Sandy Motocross

 
Always refer to "hardpack moto" for the basic set-up procedures, as that basic procedure will apply to every type of riding.
  Go to www.racetech.com and check if you have the proper spring rates, if not, install the correct springs. Always refer to "SET-UP TIPS" before adjusting anything!

Step 1: FORK REBOUND
  Start by setting the fork's rebound adjuster at the "slowest safe setting" that you came up with for your hardpack set-up. For sand riding, you are never going to be setting this adjuster FASTER than this setting!
  Set the adjuster using the same method you used for hardpack. Just make sure that your forks rebound fast enough to absorb the braking bumps on the track, and so the forks won't stay compressed after hitting the face of a jump, causing a "nose low" sensation in the air.

Step 2: FORK COMPRESSION
  Start by setting your fork's compression adjuster to the "starting to get harsh" setting you have for hardpack. For sand riding, you are never going to be setting this adjuster SOFTER than this setting! Sand is very soft and springy. Sometimes it will require a surprisingly stiff compression clicker setting, depending on the type of sand you are racing in.
  Set the adjuster using the same method you used for hardpack.
  If you race in sand most of the time, it would be a great idea to get your suspension revalved for it, as stock supension valving is usually to soft. If not, your compression clickers will need to be so stiff to prevent bottoming, that harshness will become a major issue. You will have to test and see what works for you, and/or how much harshness you can stand...
  You need to keep in mind that the compression adjuster adjusts the LOW SPEED DAMPING more than the HIGH SPEED DAMPING! If your adjuster is too stiff, your bike won't weight transfer properly during braking, and your bike won't squat enough on jump faces, both making the handling somewhat quirky and dangerous.

Step 3: SHOCK REBOUND
  Start by setting the shock's rebound adjuster at the "slowest safe setting" that you came up with for your hardpack setup. For sand riding, you will never need to set this adjuster any FASTER than this setting.
  Set this adjuster using the same method you used for hardpack. You will be surprized to see how slow the rebound needs to be to combat swapping in the whoops. Make sure the rebound isn't so slow that it makes the shock pack in the whoops, and make the bike jump "nose high".

Step 4: SHOCK COMPRESSION (single compression adjuster shock)
  Start by setting the shock's compression adjuster at the "stiffest safe setting" that you came up with for your hardpack setup. For sand riding, you will never need to set this adjuster any SOFTER than this setting.
  Keep in mind that this adjuster sets the LOW SPEED COMPRESSION. Set this adjuster using the same method you used for hardpack. Like setting the fork compression adjuster with stock valving, you will have to test and see how much harshness you can stand. A revalve is the only good option.

Step 5: SHOCK COMPRESSION (HIGH SPEED) IF APPL.
  Adjust the low speed compression the same way as you would with a "single compression adjuster" shock. This is done with the high speed compression adjuster in the middle of it's range.
  Like the hardpack procedure, turn this adjuster in until the shock is obviously stiffer than the forks. Large whoops or any place on the track that requires a fair bit of bottoming resistance is ideal. Turn the adjuster out in 1/4 turn increments until a nice balanced feel is achieved between the front and rear wheel.

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